Holistic Glasses

Welcome to Holistic Glasses: The tumblr Edition.
Words cannot explain how excited and happy this makes me.  I’ve long held a deep love for AtLA and LoK. Not only are both series entertaining, but there’s great attention to detail and copious amounts of effort that clearly went into each episode. To have this kind of commentary and insight from one the minds behind the shows just makes my day. 


michaeldantedimartino:

New blog post. Some thoughts about the end Book 2 of Korra. Even though we identify as human beings, we have the potential to tap into something beyond our human forms.View Post
Words cannot explain how excited and happy this makes me. I’ve long held a deep love for AtLA and LoK. Not only are both series entertaining, but there’s great attention to detail and copious amounts of effort that clearly went into each episode. To have this kind of commentary and insight from one the minds behind the shows just makes my day.

michaeldantedimartino:

New blog post. Some thoughts about the end Book 2 of Korra. Even though we identify as human beings, we have the potential to tap into something beyond our human forms.

View Post

beingblog:

A big, tough samurai once went to see a little monk.



“Monk!”



He barked, in a voice accustomed to instant obedience.



“Teach me about heaven and hell!”



The monk looked up at the mighty warrior and replied with utter disdain,



“Teach you about heaven and hell? I couldn’t teach you about anything. You’re dumb. You’re dirty. You’re a disgrace, an embarrassment to the samurai class. Get out of my sight. I can’t stand you.”



The samurai got furious. He shook, red in the face, speechless with rage. He pulled out his sword, and prepared to slay the monk.
Looking straight into the samurai’s eyes, the monk said softly,



“That’s hell.”



The samurai froze, realizing the compassion of the monk who had risked his life to show him hell! He put down his sword and fell to his knees, filled with gratitude.
The monk said softly,



“And that’s heaven.”



Excerpted from Conscious Business: How to Build Value Through Values.
~Trent Gilliss, senior editor


A good lesson to stew on for a little while.

beingblog:

A big, tough samurai once went to see a little monk.

“Monk!

He barked, in a voice accustomed to instant obedience.

“Teach me about heaven and hell!”

The monk looked up at the mighty warrior and replied with utter disdain,

“Teach you about heaven and hell? I couldn’t teach you about anything. You’re dumb. You’re dirty. You’re a disgrace, an embarrassment to the samurai class. Get out of my sight. I can’t stand you.”

The samurai got furious. He shook, red in the face, speechless with rage. He pulled out his sword, and prepared to slay the monk.

Looking straight into the samurai’s eyes, the monk said softly,

“That’s hell.”

The samurai froze, realizing the compassion of the monk who had risked his life to show him hell! He put down his sword and fell to his knees, filled with gratitude.

The monk said softly,

“And that’s heaven.”

Excerpted from Conscious Business: How to Build Value Through Values.

~Trent Gilliss, senior editor

A good lesson to stew on for a little while.

Boston and right action

Achilles killed Hector and then dragged his body around the walls of Troy because he was a dick. Now let’s see how this applies to the bombings in Boston…

When i see the way people have reacted to the events in Boston, i can’t help but be reminded of an angry, starved mongrel. The news coverage has been ridiculous (and not in a funny way) and our vision is cripplingly parochial; bloodthirsty spectators are glued to corporate news networks and are too busy demanding bits of flesh to even consider spending less time demanding revenge and more time asking, “Why?”

I am in no way trying to make less of what happened at the Boston Marathon; i truly sympathize with all of the victims. However, we fail to remember that this was not 9/11. This was not the 7/7 London bombings, nor was it the 11-M bombings in Madrid. Yet we continue to act otherwise. Now, we have the younger bomber in custody and people continue to froth at the mouth. I see how we act and i am both worried and ashamed.

Okay. Back to Homer. 

Hector went to battle because it was his duty, not because he sought glory or honor or revenge. When he killed Patroclus on the battlefield, he left the body alone. Why? Because he wasn’t a dick. When Achilles went out for revenge, he killed Hector and then desecrated his body while all of Troy looked on. Why? Because he was a dick. 

In regards to the young man who is now in custody, would it not be better for us to act as Hector would and not Achilles? Let’s do what needs to be done - investigate and arrive at a verdict - and turn our energy towards healing and helping the victims of the attack. In other words, don’t be a dick.

Disclaimer: I know i’ve used the Hector/Achilles line before.  I get the feeling that i will have to use it again in the future, and that makes me sad.

 

 

On Being with Krista Tippett

—No More Taking Sides with Robi Damelin and Ali Abu Awwad

beingblog:

In light of the horrific stories coming out of Gaza and Israel, I’d encourage all of us to listen to this interview we did with two remarkable human beings: Robi Damelin, who lost her son David to a Palestinian sniper, and Ali Abu Awwad, who lost his older brother Yousef to an Israeli soldier. 

Instead of clinging to traditional ideologies and turning their pain into more violence, they’ve decided to understand the other side — Israeli and Palestinian — by sharing their pain and their humanity. They tell of a gathering network of survivors who share their grief, their stories of loved ones, and their ideas for lasting peace. They don’t want to be right; they want to be honest. No more taking sides.

This is one of the most powerful things i’ve listened to in quite some time.  I can’t think of any better way to point out the necessity for a dialogue of empathy.

wishes

If this doesn’t make you smile, you’re taking things too seriously and should probably just chill for a moment.

//

Stumbled upon the picture here.

worship

Some worship in churches of wood and stone.

I worship in temples of trees and mountains.

Photo: Good Morning, by me

islamic democracy

The Arab Spring has come and gone and despite the sharp erosion of stability in the region, several states hope to emerge victorious from the rubble.  They continue to strive on towards that ultimate goal that first ignited the roaring wave of revolutions and conflict: democracy and equality.  Initially, people in western democracies felt excitement.  They lived vicariously through the Tunisian protestors, the courageous Egyptians who stood unflinching before the police, and the Yemenis who went out in protest day after day until their ruler abdicated his seat.  Today, however, those same westerners have traded in their excitement for apprehension.

Westerners felt delight at hearing that countries such as Tunisia and Egypt were holding fair and open elections.  Yet their tune changed dramatically when news began to spread of religiously-based political parties that took the lead in pre-election polls.  Instead of delight, westerners began to feel trepidation.

In the days before last year’s elections in Tunisia, for instance, Al Jazeera reported that Ennahdah (The Rennaisance) was leading opinion polls[1].  Despite stressing their support for full democracy and pluralism, westerners are wary of this party.  In Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood has stolen the spotlight.  Just a few days ago, Time published an article that exemplifies western sentiment towards the Muslim Brotherhood and non-secular Middle Eastern politics in general[2].  Regardless of what these parties stand for, it seems as though the biggest problem westerners have with these parties is that they are openly Islamist.

Now i should clarify two points here.  First of all, i’m not addressing the aforementioned parties’ platforms.  The issue here isn’t whether or not i agree with any of their policies; rather, my focus is on why the west seems to distrust them and, more importantly, whether or not westerners are right to be suspicious.

Second, when i say that these parties are Islamist, i am saying that they freely admit to being based at least in part- if not wholly- on Islamic ideals.  This is not to be confused with the idea of political Islam, which carries the connotation of radicalism and the establishment of Sharia law.

It is, of course, interesting to note that the most vocal westerners- especially in the U.S.- who oppose these Islamist parties are often vehement supporters of parties based on Christian beliefs and values.  But that’s not the important thing here.  What’s important is that when discussing the issue of politics in the Middle East, religion takes center stage.

Westerners are all too aware of the presence of religion in Middle Eastern politics and this awareness leads many to roll their eyes and ask, “Is democracy even possible in the Middle East?”  And i have an answer for those individuals.

Yes.

As simple as my answer is, the question is actually a difficult one to address.  And it all comes down to culture.

In the west, democracy is seen as inherently secular[3].  This is because the first modern democracy in the west was founded in the U.S. at a time when cultural and religious pluralism was perhaps the greatest and most mind-blowing characteristic of the young nation.  Secularism became a necessity.  Although a majority of Americans were Christian, they came from a number of different sects, which means that establishing a fundamentalist Christian government was simply out of the question.

Additionally, there is the issue of Christianity and politics.  Christianity is rather distinct from the other Abrahamic traditions because unlike Judaism and Islam, Christianity does not lay down the framework for social and state structure.  It has long been used as a political tool (and vice-versa), but at its roots, Christianity does not define political roles or other power structures.

The result of all of this is a definition that makes democracy as we know it incompatible with Middle Eastern culture.  However, this definition does not need to be so solid.  Democracy is an adaptive concept and there’s no reason its plasticity should fail in the Middle East.

In Islamic culture, faith and legislature go hand-in-hand.  This is not necessarily a bad thing.  Fundamentalist Sharia law is indicative of extremism, but that’s not what many prominent Islamist parties (such as the aforementioned Ennahdah) are proposing.  Rather, they simply use basic Islamic ideals and values to guide their platforms.  And believe it or not, that may actually be a good thing in the long run.  Allowing true Islamist parties may very well be the one thing in Middle Eastern culture that could ensure progress and equality in the region.

For instance, one common concern regarding Islamist parties is fear that religious minorities might get the short end of the stick.  But that fear would be unfounded (or at least minimized) should a truly Islamist party be elected to office.  Why?  Because Islam is actually compatible with religious pluralism.  The Qur’an states:

“Surely the believers and the Jews, Christians, and Sabians whoever believes in God and the Last Day, and whoever does right, shall have his reward with his Lord and will neither have fear nor regret.”  (Q. 2:63)

With regards to cultural diversity, the Qur’an states:

“O humankind, We have created you, male and female and made you nations and tribes, so that you might come to know one another.”  (Q. 49:13)

Worried about women’s rights?  The Qur’an states:

“O you who believe!  You are forbidden to inherit women against their will.  Nor should you treat them with harshness.  On the contrary live with them on a footing of kindness and equity.  If you take a dislike to them it may be that you dislike a thing through which God brings about a great deal of good.”  (Q. 4:19)

Concerned that they might choose to launch a jihad?

“And fight in the way of God with those who fight you, but aggress not: God loves not the aggressors.”  (Q. 2:190)

“If your enemy inclines towards peace, then you too should seek peace and put your trust in God.”  (Q. 8:61)

“Had Allah wished, He would have made them dominate you, and so if they leave you alone and do not fight you and offer you peace, then Allah allows you no way against them.”  (Q. 4:90)

Long story short, Islamic democracy might sound like an oxymoron to western ears, but it may very well be the best tool for turning dreams of equality into a reality.  Will Islamic democracy last?  I can’t say.  But at the very least, it can lay the foundations upon which states may build societies of tolerance and equality.

True equality isn’t something that can happen overnight.  It’s something that takes generations to accomplish.  Just look at how long it’s taken the U.S. to get where it is today.  Roaring into another country and demanding that they establish a secular democracy isn’t going to work and it may actually lead to just the opposite.  So perhaps the best thing for us to do is simply back off and see whether or not Islamic democracy can work.


[1] http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2011/10/201110614579390256.html

[2] http://world.time.com/2012/09/04/as-egypts-islamists-cement-their-rule-can-secularists-reclaim-the-revolution/

[3] Admittedly, it’s all too easy to argue that religion and politics are becoming increasingly intertwined here on the home front- but that’s an issue for another time.

The original post can be read here.